Concordia Bomb Threat Trial Day 3: Suspect Ordered to Undergo Psychiatric Evaluation

Judge Rules That Confession Was “Completely Voluntary”

  • Hisham Saadi is charged in connection with a bomb threat hoax that shut down three Concordia buildings last March. File Photo Alex Bailey

Quebec Justice Melanie Hébert ruled that Hisham Saadi’s confession was completely voluntary and therefore admissible as evidence during the last day of his trial Thursday morning.

The former Concordia PhD student is charged in connection with a bomb threat hoax that shut down three Concordia buildings last March.

Hébert ordered that Saadi undergo a psychiatric evaluation at the Philippe Pinel Institute to determine whether or not he is criminally responsible. She ruled that Saadi was completely conscious for the interview.

She said that Saadi corrected police officer Frédéric Gagné at several points when he felt the details were wrong, and was coherently answering questions, without falling asleep. According to Hébert, Saadi only began mentioning that he was tired and wanted the interview to end towards the end of the interrogation.

Hébert also ruled that Saadi’s testimony was contradictory to what he told Gagné in the tape. She said that in the interrogation, he told Gagné he had eaten three meals, but during his testimony he told the court he had eaten nothing but an apple turnover all day.

On Tuesday, defense attorney Caroline Braun told the court that the tape should not be considered admissible. Braun felt the confession wasn’t voluntary as he was in a “climate of oppression.”

Saadi is charged with mischief, uttering threats, and inciting fear of a terrorist-related attack. His next court appearance is scheduled for March.

Want to know more? Our coverage of the first and second days of the trial can be found here.

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